flourless cashew cookies.

Flourless Cashew Cookies

I have a confession to make: I love cashews. If you present me with a tin of mixed nuts, I will present you back with a tin in which there are no cashews to be found – and nary a cashew crumb. I have another confession to make: I love cashew cookies. Love. My love for both nut and cookie was the inspiration for this out of this world delicious recipe. The resultant flour-less cookies are simple, sweet and nutty confections that are not only vegan, but naturally gluten-free too – and with no added fat. With only five simple ingredients, you’ll be whipping up these toothsome temptations in no time – and soon see them disappear before your very eyes. Scrumptious, with a delightful crumb: these cookies don’t disappoint. They’re a new favourite of mine.

This recipe also makes a solid base for any nut butter with minor tweaks like adjusting the amount of salt. For Peanut Butter Cookies, I increase the salt to a 1/2 teaspoon. While I list a range of salt below (1/8 up to 1/4) to account for differing tastes, I prefer the Cashew Cookies with the lesser amount of a 1/8 teaspoon. I find that while the flavour of peanut butter lends itself quite nicely to a salty counterpoint, the sweetness and subtle flavour of cashew is easily overwhelmed by too much. Experiment with other nut and seed butters too, like almond, sunflower seed, or macadamia. Enjoy!

Flourless Cashew Cookies

(vegan, gluten-free)

Ingredients:

1 cup cashew butter
1/4 cup blended silken (or soft) tofu
3/4 cup granulated (white) sugar (scoop and level) **do NOT substitute brown sugar or you’ll get flat cookies. White sugar only.
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/8 teaspoon sea salt (or up to 1/4 tsp)

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

2. Using a food processor or high powered blender, blend tofu until completely smooth.

3. In a large bowl combine cashew butter and tofu until well blended. In a separate bowl, combine sugar, baking soda, and salt. Add dry mix to wet mixture and stir until combined. **Note: The dough will be very stiff – this is normal. Do NOT add additional liquid – it’ll take some muscle to combine everything, but the stiffness is required. If you add liquid, the cookies will over spread.

4. Drop dough by slightly rounded tablespoons (or similarly sized cookie dough scoop) onto parchment-lined baking sheets. Use a fork to slightly flatten each cookie.

5. Bake for 12 to 13 minutes. The cookies will be mildly golden all over and will feel very soft to the touch when they first come out of the oven (they will harden as they cool). After baking, allow cookies to cool on baking sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to wire racks to cool completely.

Makes 18-22 cookies.

Flourless Cashew Cookies

I originally shared this recipe with T.O.F.U. Magazine, for whom I am a proud contributor.

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30 thoughts on “flourless cashew cookies.

  1. Welcome back! I’m a big fan of flourless cookies. I’d love to try this recipe with sunbutter. I probably love sunbutter as much as you love cashews.

    • Hi Evelyn :) You could definitely reduce the sugar – the resulting cookies will be softer, but still delicious! I’m planning on experimenting with several different alternative sweeteners, and I’ll post my results :)

  2. So simple and so yummy looking! I used to make a cashew butter-based cookie but not with tofu (can’t even remember what any more!). I do know mine had Sucanat, so it’s off the table now, but I bet I could do these with coconut sugar. They look SO good! :)

  3. Pingback: flourless peanut butter cookies. « Madcap Cupcake

  4. Hi, I just made these but the were very thin. I used brown sugar because that is all i had but everything else was the same. Also, I did not use parchment paper because I did not have that. They were really hard to get off the cookie sheet. The batter was not thick like you describe. What do you think happened?

    • Hi Mary! I’m so sorry the cookies didn’t turn out for you. The missing parchment paper would definitely account for the sticking problem, especially with the substitution of brown sugar (which becomes very sticky when baked). Brown sugar has molasses in it and a much higher level of moisture than regular white sugar (which is much dryer), and this, I suspect, is the likely culprit for the thinner cookies in this case. Hope that helps!

  5. I was so happy to have found the receip. I didn’t have cashew butter so I ground my own nuts into a butter consistency. I’m not sure what I did wrong but they spreed all over the place. I ended up with a layer of cookie. Any ideas?

    • Hi Eve! Thanks for visiting my blog and giving the cookies a try…I’m so sorry they didn’t work out for you! There are a few possible reasons that you got different results. One possibility is that your homemade cashew butter was ground to a point where the oils released more than the store bought one that I used (which was quite thick).

      Another possibility, and one of the most common causes for baking going awry, is an oven that runs at a different temperature. Do you use a separate oven thermometer and make sure that the oven is preheated to the correct temperature (according to the thermometer and not the oven)? Nearly all ovens run either a little hot or cold, including mine! To compensate for this, I use two separate oven thermometers (one is a backup), and those are what I trust when baking.

      Also, did you use parchment paper? Using the paper is also an important step.

      Hope that helps, and thanks again for visiting the blog :)

      • After our email conversation revealed that Eve had substituted brown sugar, I highly suspect that to be the culprit in the flattened melted cookie debacle. Since this has happened to more than one reader who decided to substitute brown sugar, I have made a note on the recipe to absolutely not substitute the white sugar with any other type.

  6. my first batch turned out awesome. and used store bought cashew butter. the second time i tired to make them, i used homemade cashew butter and they are flat. and the batch is super oily. i followed the recipe.. is there anything you can recommend to help me. cause buying store bought cashew butter in canada is 12$ for a cup.

    • Hi Michelle, apologies for the late response! I always use store bought cashew butter too. I know how nut butters can get expensive quickly…I’m in Canada too, but a $10 jar gets me two cups. Still not cheap, I know. The problem with troubleshooting homemade nut butter is that everyone does it a bit differently. I’m not a homemade nut butter making expert my any means, but my first note would be that the longer you process the nuts, the more you emulsify them and release the oils. So, try processing minimally? Other than that, I would suggest trying another nut butter, like peanut (pure peanuts, with no added oils). I’ve made a peanut butter version of this cookie before and it’s equally delicious as well being much more economical. Good luck!

  7. Marika, I’m so happy to have found your site and this recipe!! Can I substitute cashew butter for no-nut butter for kids who have nut allergy? The problem is most of the no-nut butters are already sweetened. So if I use those, I would have to greatly reduce the sugar. Do you foresee any problem if I use no or less sugar as a result?

    • Hi there! That is an excellent question. Unfortunately, I think the white sugar in its entirety is necessary in order to achieve the right consistency. Those who have tried substituting brown sugar, for example, have been met with flat cookies, which tells me that the dryness of the white sugar is truly important. That said, you could certainly try reducing the sugar and see how it goes. I might give it a try myself, as I’m curious. Perhaps the addition of a starch (cornstarch, arrowroot, etc) is in order to offset some of the missing sugar. I will definitely post my results if I give it a go!

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